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Parrot Pmk5800 Car Hands-free Kit With Fm Transmitter - Wireless - Bluetooth - Audio In, Usb Reviews
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Average Customer Rating:
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(based on 7 reviews)

71% of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Customers most agreed on the following attributes:

Pros:

Easy To Install (5), Easy To Use (3)

Primary use:

Personal (4)

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Not great in an urban area

By BigEWezzie Verified Reviewer from Los Angeles (south bay) on 07/12/2008


Cons:

Poor Performance

Describe Yourself:

Practical, Gearhead

Pros:

Easy To Install, Easy To Use

Bottom Line:

No, I would not recommend this to a friend

The FM transmitter did not work well in the Los Angeles area. The connection was difficult to find and constantly changed. I tried to work around this problem by having multiple radio station presets both on my the unit and my car stereo, but had difficultly changing the preset on the unit while in a call and even while not in a call. Otherwise... Easy to install. It paired very easily with my iPhone. When I had a strong signal the sound quality was good but not great. I love the idea of being able to use my stereo, but don't want to have to professional install. But using an FM transmitter not practical in a large city. AND as the iphone does not stream music via bluetooth (which I had to find out the hard way), I will be returning this for something else.


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solution for on the go business

By john from indianapolis on 07/01/2008


Pros:

Easy To Install, Practical Solution

Bottom Line:

Yes, I would recommend this to a friend

easy to use in multiple vehicles. Audio quality is good enough. Cannot read the led in bright sunlight.


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Parrot Pmk5800 Portable Bluetooth

By Rich Verified Purchaser from Los Angeles, CA on 03/18/2008


Cons:

Poor Performance

Describe Yourself:

Commuter

Pros:

Easy To Use, Easy To Install, Versatile

Best Uses:

Luxury Cars

Bottom Line:

Yes, I would recommend this to a friend

Easy setup, hard to locate a free FM station in the city that is clear! Works best in remote areas!!!!


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Quirky but partly me.

By Ed Starfire Verified Purchaser from Kentucky on 02/21/2008


Cons:

Too Much Static On Fm

Describe Yourself:

Gearhead

Pros:

Easy To Install

Bottom Line:

Yes, I would recommend this to a friend

It could be the radio in my car but the background "fuzz" is somewhat bothersome. I had one person say they couldn't hear me very well and i was parked in my driveway with the engine off. Others have said it was fine so it could have been phone signal. I've had a problem with my phone not pairing with it until i unplug and plug the Parrot in again. I think if you use the product on a normal basis in heavy traffic it's a good thing. If you only use it on occasion like myself it may be a little annoying to get use to each time.


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Wonderful, frustrating, but worthwhile

By Todd from Santa Monica, CA on 01/17/2008


Cons:

Too Easy To Deprogram, Awkward Position For Car, Tough Recording Voice Tag

Describe Yourself:

Commuter

Pros:

Works Well After Set Up, Easy To Install, Nice Voice Features, Good Voice Quality

Best Uses:

Luxury Cars, Larger Cars

Bottom Line:

Yes, I would recommend this to a friend

Read the great and very thorough post from the Everett user (posted 12/1), because I echo most of the same comments. The good: It is extremely easy to install as you just plug it in to the cigarette lighter, with no other physical connections necessary. Then, the Bluetooth wireless connections to my RAZR and Blackberry to the Parrot took maybe a minute each or maybe less. No problem finding a good area on FM that the Parrot liked, and that is saying something, as I live in Los Angeles where the FM dial is virtually chock a block with stations. Sound quality is excellent for receiving phone calls, although some on the other end say my voice sometimes sounds tinny and/or in tunnel, but they have no problem making out what I say. I have also used it with the top down on the convertible going freeway speeds, and the callers can still hear me, which I think is really good. No problem whatsoever with sending my contacts from the cell phone to the Parrot and then assigning them a voice tag -- this is by far my favorite aspect of this as I can make calls virtually hands free. And when an incoming call comes in the Parrot does a nice colorful flashing job, and then to answer it, just press your radio's preset number than you used to initially link it with the Parrot -- as soon as you hit your preset FM station, the Parrot connects you to the incoming phone call and the caller's voice comes out on your car's speaker system. Fantastic! And totally intuitive and easy, as if was built-in to your car. And, hey, for about a hundred bucks, it is quite the bargain compared to putting in a custom system. The Not So Good: It protrudes a lot from the cigarette lighter -- a good 4 inches. While the stem does allow you to turn it and twist it out a bit, I have a two-seater sports car with a stick shift and the lighter hole is near fifth gear, so I really had to play it with for awhile before I could find a position that I wouldn't hit it with my hand when switching to fifth gear. And that new position makes it stick a bit out into the passenger side, and, well, it is a little awkward looking (although passengers tend to comment on liking the high-techyness of it all). Then, also as the Everett poster said, it is far too easy to change the language of the unit by accidentally pressing the dial button -- highly annoying, because you then have to cycle through dozens of languages before it comes back to English, and this has happened several times. But the single worst thing (as the poster from Everett said) is trying to record the "magic" word commands so you can get a dial tone or hang up with just your voice. Unlike the Everett poster, I understood the British lady's voice just fine, but the problem is she didn't like mine very much at all. The words "hang up" took me a good five minutes and maybe two dozen times before Lady England understood me and accepted what she must perceive is my atrocious American accent. And for those "magic" words, you have to repeat back exactly what she tells you; don't try saying "cell" when she tells you to say "mobile." She has still not accepted my pronunciation of "mobile," after days of repeatedly trying to please her, and I finally just gave up trying to woo her and had to call it quits on this feature. Which means I have to hit the green button manually on the Parrott unit instead of just saying "phone." But really, while this was annoying and frustrating, it is no big deal because as soon as I hit the green button, I can then rely on my voice to dial with pre-recorded tags for my entire phonebook -- that is, I hit the green button, the British Lady says, "say the name of your contact", I say "work" and the British Lady dials my office and connects me. And all of this is fantastic because I can now keep my eye on the road at all times except for the microsecond that I am hitting the green button to activate this feature. You do, as the Everett poster says, manually have to send each of your contacts from your phone via Bluetooth one at a time and then record a voice tag for each one (the British Lady is much cooler and more relaxed with accepting your custom tags for your phone contacts than she is with her very picky to pronounce "magic words.") But hey, that's pretty much what I had to do when I bought a new cell phone, so it is, I think, to be expected. But you should be aware of it, especially if you are the type that wants to do no work whatsoever. All in all, I am very happy with it, and it is a vast improvement over a headset, and certainly an infinite improvement over putting the phone next to your ear while driving. Still, I hope Parrot is listening and fixes some of the annoying aspects.


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Some good points, some bad

By Chi Verified Purchaser from Everett, WA on 12/01/2007


Primary use of this product:

Personal

Cons:

Loses Settings, No True Voice Recognition, Cumbersome Setup, Difficult To Use, Mediocre Sound Quality

Describe Yourself:

Tech Savvy

Pros:

Quality Construction, Can Choose Fm Freq, Controls For Bt Music, Quasi-voice-controlled

Best Uses:

Easily Add Bt To Car

Primary use:

Personal

Bottom Line:

No, I would not recommend this to a friend

Let me start by saying that for [$]it's not a bad deal, and it works (mostly). It's a good concept, it's compact, and it can swivel to different angles -- very useful for something that sticks out about 4-5" from your socket. The voice quality for the person at the other end is good, and you can speak in a normal voice.The basic premise of this unit is to take input via Bluetooth (or the provided audio cable), and rebroadcast it on an FM channel of your choice so you can hear it on your radio. That input would normally be a phone call via Bluetooth, but if your phone or MP3 player supports it, it could be music via Bluetooth. Or, music from your phone or MP3 player via the audio cable.It has some very cool features:* You can answer the phone by pressing the green button, OR you can just switch the car radio to the frequency that the Parrot is on. Since you need to switch the radio anyways (to hear the other person), this is very handy. Unless you already had the radio on this frequency because you were listening to music via the Parrot, in which case you can just use the green button.* Also very nice is that if you're playing music through the Parrot via Bluetooth, you have controls on the PMK5800 to play/pause, reverse, fast-forward, skip-ahead/back. If you're playing music via the cable, then the play/pause button will mute/un-mute the music (but not stop/start the music source).* If it recognizes the phone number of an incoming call as one you've created a voice tag for it will play back the voice tag when the call comes in.* You can choose any FM frequency -- unlike most FM transmitters, which limit you to a handful. In fact, you can choose to set up to 9 "preset" frequencies (but see below).* If you have keywords set, you can wake up the unit by saying "telephone" (but see below).* You can pair multiple phones without much effort, and it will switch between them (if necessary) without intervention.HOWEVER:* The British woman's voice they chose for the prompts is atroctious. I mean, c'mon, you could cut that accent with a chainsaw. You can't even tell what she's saying for some of the keyword prompts.* As you cycle through the options via the knob: sometimes they're all there, sometimes there's just a couple. It's odd to me.* Speaking of the keywords: if you choose to set them, you're prompted to record your voice for keywords (e.g. "telephone") that you can use to control the device. But you can't tell what she's saying when she prompts you to say that word (read the manual to see which words she's prompting for). And, other than "telephone", I've yet to see the other keywords work. AND, you can't go back and re-record them. I suppose you can wipe the memory and start over...* Regarding the settings -- it loses them. I set all 9 of the possible frequency presets and it promptly lost them the next time I used it. And the time after that that I set them... I've also set my home phone voice tag 3 times now -- it really seems to pick on that one to lose or not recognize.* Also, regarding the settings: it's WAY too easy to accidentally change the language. And then moderately difficult/annoying to get it back to English.* It's hard in any metro area to find a frequency that's not close to a used frequency. If there's a strong signal on the frequency you chose, or near it, then the prompts/phone-call/music will be scratchy. Where you put the unit in your car is also important as to your sound quality -- on my dash it works great (doesn't look great), but in my center console works poorly (even with the console open). Even if you find a good frequency you're not going to get *great* sound for music. A direct connection to your radio, or even a cassette adapter (old school!) is much better. Some music (e.g. hard rock) overwhelms the signal and it gets distorted. But mostly its not bad, and for phone calls it's plenty adequate.* It doesn't really have voice recognition. You can record voice tags (read the next item though), but you can't dial a number by saying the digits. So, for a "hands free" unit you still end up handling the phone to dial impromptu calls. Once you've dialed the call via your phone however you can set it down and handle it all from there via the Parrot.* Voice tags: ugh. You have to put it in the voice tag mode, then use your phone to send (via Bluetooth) one contact # at a time, then record (twice) the "tag" (your voice) that it will try to match to later. It can't be too short (e.g. "Bob") and you have to say it loud.* The unit has a tendency to not stay seated in the power socket. This is annoying because you don't want to always be pressing hard on this thing to seat it, especially if you have the unit twisted into an angled shape. And you don't know it's not powered on for about 6 or 7 seconds after you've turned the car on because it doesn't light up until then. So, often, you go driving merrily on your way not noticing you're not enabled. They do send along a large rubber washer as part of the kit -- I installed that near the tip of the unit and now it seems to stay seated better, but it makes it hard to get it out or in of the socket* Not important, but a little lame: they put a funky sticker on the side of the unit to cover up a speaker grill there (as I recall it was a picture of cars and musical notes, and it was bright red -- it looked like something you'd find on a cheap Chinese toy). They must've changed the design midway 'cause it's not used. I just peeled the sticker off.I have no other plug-and-play, hands-free, Bluetooth phone system to compare this to. It seems to me that despite the many faults, it's not a bad deal for the price and it works good enough for me. But I suppose if you have a lot of phone numbers you need to call completely and consistently hands-free you might not like it. Or if you're easily annoyed by quirks and faults. Or if you want really good wireless music playback. Or if you travel through a lot of FM station areas and you have trouble finding open frequencies and switching between them.


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This a good product and I very happy wit

By LR Verified Purchaser from LA, CA on 11/30/2007


Primary use of this product:

Personal

Describe Yourself:

Professional

Pros:

Quality Construction, Easy To Set Up, Easy To Use

Best Uses:

Enhance Experience

Primary use:

Personal

Bottom Line:

Yes, I would recommend this to a friend

Easy to set up and good and I am using all the time during my driving. Excellent reception and noise reduction


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